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BobbyG



PostPosted: Tue 12/29/09 3:24 pm    Post subject: Saltwater Fly Rod Review: Best All Around Fly Rod? Reply with quote

Hello,

I'm new to this Forum and am looking for some suggestions.
I tried the search feature before asking this question....no help.

My stepson and I are looking to get into some saltwater flyfishing for bones, snook, redfish, and smallish tarpon. We will have the use of a flats boat. Running in and around Islamorada, Florida a couple of times a year.
We reside in North Carolina. We realize we are the rankest of amateurs but look forward to learning all we can.

Our question at this time is "is there a rod we can make use of for all these species"? 8 or 9 weight? 9 footer? Buy a production rod or have one built for us? I'm currently looking at a G. Loomis 9 foot for a WF8, fast action. My stepson is looking at a 9 foot for a WF9 built on a Tiger Eye blank. Just looking!

Any help would be most appreciated!

Thanks in advance. Welcome any questions you may have.

Bob
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rustayy


Location: Islamorada,FL

PostPosted: Wed 12/30/09 10:46 am    Post subject: All around rod for the salt Reply with quote

Welcome to the site! These days there are so many great rods out there it is hard to wrong with any of them. It basically comes down to what you want to spend and how picky you are. For 1 rod to do it all in the salt I would recommend a 9' 9 wt. It is good in just about all applications. It may be a little overkill for bones, and maybe under gunned for tarpon (depending on their size)but will do all just fine. As far as brands....well, it comes down to what you want to spend. Top dogs would be Sage, T&T, Orvis, Loomisamong others, but if you don't want to spend a lot of money there are a bunch of lower end rods that will do the job just fine that I can recommend. Look at the Reddington CPX. I have it in a 10 wt and it did just fine for poons! Also look at Temple Fork, in particular the TiCR, and the TICRX. Both are great rods and they retail for about $200.00.

Also don't rule out buying used rods. You can find great deals on used top of the line rods on EBay. Just about all of them come with a lifetime warantee that covers just about anything you could possibly do to break the rod. Have fun in the Keys! Islamorada has some great bonefishing! Get ready to be addicted to flats fishing.
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kory_k


Location: New York, NY

PostPosted: Wed 12/30/09 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome! I would agree with what rustayy said. I would definitely go with the 9 weight rod. You are far better off being overgunned than undergunned especially when it comes to saltwater fly fishing. There are various factors that come into play including fish size, throwing larger flies, throwing heavy sinking lines and more important than anything else, being able to throw in windy conditions. Anybody that has fished saltwater for any amount of time knows that the wind is a constant nemesis. A 9 weight rod will allow you to combat the wind a lot easier. More than likely if you enjoy your time fly fishing you will inevitably end up getting another rod or if you are like me you will end up getting several more rods Very Happy A 9 weight also should be a perfect match for most of the species. It may be a little on the heavy side for smaller bones but not too bad especially again in the wind or with heavier flies. I personally am partial to both Sage and Loomis and the Loomis rod you are looking at would be a great choice. Sage has a new series out this year the Xi3 and if money is not an object I would look at one of these. They are super lightweight, powerful great casting rods. The TFO rods are great rods for the money as rustayy said and if you don't want to spend as much they are a great option. One reason I like Sage and one reason they are more expensive is that they are made in the USA. For the most part you won't find many rods made in the USA for a lower price point. Sage does have a few less expensive series such as the Vantage and the Launch which both are pretty good rods for the money. As far as having one custom built I would not go that route unless you want to build it yourself and enjoy the process of building a rod. The reason I wouldn't go this route is that custom built rods are usually only warrantied for the blank so if you break it you get a blank back and then have to either rebuild the rod or pay someone to do it wheras a rod is full warrantied and you get a complete rod back.
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BobbyG



PostPosted: Wed 12/30/09 1:43 pm    Post subject: Thank you Reply with quote

both for the welcome and good advice rustayy and kory_k!

We realize we both have lots to learn but want to approach this style fishing with the best possible tool for the money.

My stepson has done lots of deep sea fishing but has become mesmerized by the fly. He has fished for freshwater trout with me a few times so he is not a total novice. I've been fishing for freshwater trout, largemouth bass, and bluegills for about 30 years now. I'm a bamboo fisherman but realize I'm better off using graphite in this environment.

Just came across a mint T&T Model 908XL 9', 8 weight for $250.00 this morning. Includes the original sock and tube. Any opinions on this rod?
I know T&T makes a great bamboo rod.

Thanks again and would appreciate any others thoughts!

Bob
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Firstlitebite


Location: Western Long Island Sound, CT

PostPosted: Thu 12/31/09 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey bobby,

If this is your first purchase of a fly rod, and first time going after small tarpon/snook etc, I would steer away from buying a fast action rod. A medium-slow action rod will allow you to feel the rod load, thus helping you know when to deliever the fly. It will also allow you to develop a slower, more evenly distributed stroke, allowing the whole rod to do the work. rather then just the tip as many fast action rods won't feel "loaded" in a traditional sense of this word. Also, I recomend to people I meet at my shop that if there used to bamboo or have come from trout fishing, give an 8wt a shot. The presentation is generally more gentle then a 9wt. and by the sound of things your doing some technical/light tackle fishing. Also, a well balanced 8wt rod and reel is very, very light in hand. Meaning you can cast more, with less stress on that elbow and shoulder. For price point I would say buy a good 8 wt rod, something from Temple Fork or Orvis. Pair it with a light reel - an easy to use drag - Ross Reels , CLA 5, is perfectly suited for that.

hope this helps. Good luck, happy new year.
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BobbyG



PostPosted: Thu 12/31/09 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Firstlitebite!

I'm sure I would be more comfortable with a medium to medium fast action rod as that is what I'm accustomed to fishing. My concern was with the wind, thinking a faster action would cut the wind better? I'll take a look at Temple Fork and Orvis.

Considering a Lamson Velocity Hard Alox reel in either 8 or 9 weight.
Any opinions on this reel? As I understand it, the Velocity has a great sealed drag and a very impervious to salt finish. I'll also take a look at the Ross. Have a couple of Ross reels for trout fishing and they are great reels.
A RR3 for a 6 weight and a Gunnison for a 5.

Thanks again for the input!!

Bob
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Firstlitebite


Location: Western Long Island Sound, CT

PostPosted: Mon 01/04/10 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob,

A Lamson or a Ross are both good choices. I'm not sure which is lighter, there probably very close. For casting into the wind, a fast action rod will not mean greater distance. A tight loop - the product of a slow, medium or fast action rod, is what will make casting into the wind work. I would stick to a medium action rod, becasue feeling the rod load will help you cast farther, wind or no wind. Plus, if your fishing weighted flies, a forgiving stick will help you find a comfortable stroke.


Good luck!
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BobbyG



PostPosted: Tue 01/05/10 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Firstlitebite wrote:
Bob,

A Lamson or a Ross are both good choices. I'm not sure which is lighter, there probably very close. For casting into the wind, a fast action rod will not mean greater distance. A tight loop - the product of a slow, medium or fast action rod, is what will make casting into the wind work. I would stick to a medium action rod, becasue feeling the rod load will help you cast farther, wind or no wind. Plus, if your fishing weighted flies, a forgiving stick will help you find a comfortable stroke.


Good luck!


Thank you! Good info!!

Bob
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biscayne


Location: Miami Biscayne Bay

PostPosted: Wed 01/13/10 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bobby,
If this will be your first time Fly fishing in salt water, I would defiantly go to your local fly shop and cast every rod they have in the shop within your budget. Most fly shops will let you do this as long as you bring your own reel and fly line.
For bonefishing, on calm days I use an 8wt G-Loomis classic GLX. For me this is the best rod ever maid. Fast actions but you can still feel the rod load.
For permit fishing I use a 9 or 10wt Classic GLX or Cross Current GLX. Again this is what works for me. You will need a faster rod for when the wind picks up which is quite often in South Florida.

For small tarpon 5 to 30 lbs a 9wt rod should be fine.
As you can see there is never one perfect rod. I would recommend a 9wt rod medium fast action for a first saltwater rod. A great reel for a 9 wt rod is the Ross Momentum #5. This is what I use for my customers and Ross has always performed for me.

I highly recommend you practice double hauling your line and start practicing your accuracy and distance before you get out there looking for fish. I would start off by casting at least 50 feet accurately and then go from there.

I hope this helps,
Capt. Raul Montoro
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BobbyG



PostPosted: Sat 01/16/10 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Capt. Raul!

You guys are a great source of information!

We've not made any purchases as of yet and are inputting all of the info we've recieved here.

Thanks again to all!

Bob
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john2



PostPosted: Sat 01/16/10 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm new here too, but let me give you a little of my experience getting into salt. I'd done bluegills, bass, trout etc for years b4 the "the Keys"-bug bit me-thank you Flip and Andy. I had a quality rod(Sage XP 8wt) and bought another(10wt XP), but the reels I showed up with were, in retrospect, stupid. My suggestions are: 1) Buy the best you can afford. There's value in quality stuff- Abel, Tibor, Sage, Loomis. Even if you don't continue, there's a good aftermarket. Don't buy too much. An 8 or 9wt is good, with a quality reel is plenty to start. 2) practice with that rod, esp. getting casts off with a minimum of backcasts. 3) get a guide for the first few days, and really pay attention to his equipment and rigging. There was no bigger shock to me than the leaders and knots. 4) get a great pair of sun glasses. 5) believe the guide when,at the end of the day, he says you need practice on seeing/casting/hooking/fighting fish, and then, go to Belize.
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BobbyG



PostPosted: Tue 01/19/10 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks john2.

We certainly don't expect to be instant experts.
We're looking forward to the experience of learning this style flyrodding.
We are aware there may be fishless days and that's fine.
Just being out and enjoying our time together and acquiring the knowledge necessary will be a lot of fun.

Can you expound on leaders and knots?
I tie my own leaders, so look forward to new formulae.
New knots? Bring 'em on.

Thanks again!

Bob
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john2



PostPosted: Tue 01/19/10 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leaders and knots in salt have spawned scores of books and articles, and alot of opinions. Few are "wrong" and most are good. I'm a long way from a knot expert or even a good student. To start, I'd just buy 'em. Rio bonefish leaders are good, along with a couple of spools of tippet. Their tarpon leaders are good too. One bonefish or other nontoothy fish set-up I've had luck with is the Rio 20# bonefish leader plus some 16# Orvis fluorocarbon tippet. The diameters match up well and it knots good. Lately I've been using twisted leaders, esp for big flies. Get used to all the other stuff, and then branch out with leader voodoo. ps take a look at www.midcurrent.com, some good videos there
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biscayne


Location: Miami Biscayne Bay

PostPosted: Tue 01/19/10 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bobby,
I like to start off with a 5 or 6' but sections of 40lbs fluorocarbon then 30-20-15 and 12. It really doesn’t have to be fancy as long as it turns your fly over evenly. I use a nail knot or an Albright directly to the fly line for my butt section and then I blood knot the rest of the sections. This is what I use typically for my bonefish and permit rods.
Raul
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BobbyG



PostPosted: Wed 01/20/10 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Raul!

I should have no problem with that! I've never used fluorocarbon. I mostly use Maxima Chameleon for the butt and gradations. What are the advantages in using fluoro? Any disadvantages?


Bob
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kory_k


Location: New York, NY

PostPosted: Sun 01/24/10 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Primary advantages of fluorocarbon are that it is more abrasion resistant and less visible. It doesn't break down as easily as mono though, so it is not as environmentally friendly. There is also a lot of debate lately about how truly less visible it is, but many people swear by it and it does give you that extra little advantage. I use it in situations where the fish tend to be very particular and in situations where my tippet tends to get beat up.
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